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Internships Advice

How to Schedule and Prepare for a Successful Interview

Hand watering plants and employees in flowerpots. Vector illustration for growth, development, career training concept

 

Our team here at Pagoda recognizes that growing your career (both in-person and now remotely!) presents many challenges, every step of the way. No matter what stage you are at right now, here is some advice you can use to prepare for all of your interviews.

 

Timing

Scheduling an interview at a good time is not always as straightforward as it seems. Arranging your interview at a time when the interviewer is most alert can positively influence the interviewer’s perception of your fit for the internship.

Timing is also important for building relationships with the professionals you may be working with in the future. For instance, earlier interviews in the middle of the week are more likely to be when people are working at peak productivity, increasing the likelihood of full engagement and deeper conversation.

 

  • Aim to schedule interviews earlier in the day, and in the middle of the week
  • Pay attention to time zone differences!

Efficiency

Scheduling interviews efficiently promotes positive experiences for both candidates and hiring teams. There are apps organizations use to increase efficiency- from sharing a Calendly link or using Google calendars, to other software to help account for timezone differences. Familiarize yourself with what the company uses, and be sure to set appropriate reminders for yourself. This is especially important if you are working across multiple scheduling platforms!

  • Be familiar with the industry-standard scheduling tools
  • Set reminders for yourself, especially if you are working across platforms

It is important to put a date and a time that is suitable for yourself, and an outline of communication. If that has not already been outlined to you, it is also important for you to communicate that you are flexible. – Liam Dempsey


Image of Pagoda Projects Staff Member Liam Dempsey
Liam Dempsey: Chengdu Branch Manager at Pagoda Projects

”Once you have been accepted for an interview, which is fantastic, you can move to the next step of your process which will be to confirm your time and speak to your host company and the individuals involved. So it is important to put a date and a time that is suitable for yourself and also an outline of communication. If that has not already been outlined to you, it is also important for you to communicate that you are flexible. For example, you might be able to put forward to speak on Tuesday at 10 am, UK time via zoom, but it is also important to outline that you can also be flexible for other times.

So when it comes to your interview, you might realize you might have some issues to attend the interview or certain stage of the process due to an illness, or maybe something unexpected come up, this does happen to all of us sometimes, so just look to communicate this with the individual that you have been talking to from the company, look to apologize for the inconvenience, and make it very clear to arrange another time.”


Preparation

Do your research about the role, company, and industry for any position are interviewing for. You don’t need to have all the answers, but recruiters and hiring managers can always tell when you’ve put in a genuine effort to learn about the role. Take this quote from Pagoda Alumni Victoria Rudolph, who completed an internship in 2015 in China with a Law Firm.

There are three areas that are very key to understand before you [start] the interview. Number one is the role itself. Do you understand what the role is and what you will be expected to do? Number two is the company itself- make sure you understand their product or services, anything relevant in the news. Thirdly, I would say the industry at large: the sector and their competitors. Knowing these three areas, you’ll feel a lot more confident going in. – Victoria Rudolph

The key to a successful interview is being prepared, but not just prepared for answering questions! Make sure you are also visibly and technologically prepared- this means dressing for the role that you want and having tested your technology before going into the interview.

  • Research the role, company, and industry you are interviewing for
  • Always show up about 10 minutes early for your interview
  • Make sure your technology works ahead of time

Pauline Barba
Pauline Barba: Application Manager at Pagoda Projects

”When you are arranging your interviews with the host company via e-mail, make sure to first double-check the time difference before you give your availability, and always include both your time and their time just to make sure if everybody is on the same page. Show up about ten minutes early for your interview, just to make sure technology is working, the internet is working, and dress up accordingly for your interview- smart and casual.”

 


Conclusion

There is no one true “best time” to schedule your interview or a one-size-fits-all method for a successful one. However, in making an effort to have good timing, efficiency, and preparation, you increase your chances of leaving a good impression with your interviewer.

Golden Tip:

Whenever you are asked if you can do a job, tell ’em, ‘Certainly I can!’ Then get busy and find out how to do it.  –Theodore Roosevelt

 

Reverse Culture Shock
Internship Experience, Internships Advice, Participant Perspectives

Reverse Culture Shock

Reverse Culture Shock

As my first group of interns prepare to return back to the UK, one topic of conversation that has been heavily discussed is reverse culture shock.  As someone who has travelled a fair amount, I am well acquainted with this confusing feeling.  However, compared to regular culture shock, the reverse feeling felt upon return to one’s home is rarely discussed.  This blog will explain the sensation and hopefully give you some tips on how to prepare and combat reverse culture shock.

So, what is reverse culture shock?

Reverse culture shock is pretty much exactly what it states on the tin; it’s a feeling of shock, isolation, or unfamiliarity when you return home after living abroad for a considerable period of time.  It can even sometimes be worse than culture shock felt when first experiencing life in a new place, because you assume that since you are returning somewhere full of family and friends the change will be easier to deal with.  However, a lot of people often explain this transition to be more difficult as they are returning to the same place, but not returning as the same person.  No one at home completely understands the journey you have been on, and you miss the people you shared that journey with.  People at home will often be interested in hearing tales from your time abroad right after your return, but they might become disinterested after a few days or weeks, and this can lead to feelings of frustration and isolation as no one understands the life you lived abroad.

Accept your feelings

Although you may feel down or upset for a period of time after your return, the most important thing is to understand why you are feeling that way.  Hopefully this blog will help you to understand this feeling and be aware of reverse culture shock, so if you do experience it you at least know what is happening.  There’s always so much focus on preparing to travel somewhere, but hardly ever preparation for returning home.  It always feels rushed and last minute as you try and pack in as much fun as possible in the last few days in your temporary home.  So, it’s easy to forget to remind yourself that you may find moving home more difficult than moving away.  But accept whatever feelings come, and don’t feel bad about feeling bad!  It’s totally normal and little can be done to prevent missing your time abroad, because let’s be honest, living everyday as an adventure is of course going to be more fun that the daily life you’re used to back home.  But you will slowly adjust back to life at home, and everyday will get easier, just don’t be surprised if sometimes you feel sad or lonely for a day or two.

Stay calm

A major factor which plays into reverse culture shock is often the fact that relatives and friends may not be as interested in hearing about your time abroad as you had hoped.  After a few days, they may grow tired of hearing you talk about your time away but try not to be frustrated or offended.  Try your best to put yourself in their position.  While you have been away discovering new food and making new friends, most people at home have been living their same daily lives and may not want to hear how good a time you have had compared to them.  In addition, it’s important to remember that the world at home did not stand still when you were away.  People change, situations change, and the place you return to may not feel exactly as it did when you initially left.  Be patient, and things will begin to feel normal again.

Stay connected

Thankfully today it is possible to stay in touch with people you met on your travels through the magic of social media. Ease of communication is one pro of the ever-evolving social media used constantly in today’s world. If you ever feel down or alone, give your friends from your internship or your travels a message on Facebook (or WeChat!) and see if they’re feeling the same way. It’s important to recognise that these feelings are totally normal, and most people will be going through the same confusing emotions, so talk about them, or just have a catch up and see how everyone is adapting to life back at home!

Keep busy

Similar to regular culture shock, one of the best ways to overcome reverse culture shock is keeping busy. Don’t let yourself spend days on end sitting in your room reminiscing about your time abroad, this will probably only make adjusting to life back at home even harder. Make plans with friends, cook dinner for your family, go for a run, start to learn a new language, basically anything that keeps your mind occupied and helps you keep developing! When you were abroad, you probably did your best to use your time wisely and fit as many activities in as possible. Take this mentality back home and live each day to it’s fullest. Is there somewhere nearby your hometown where you’ve never explored? Is there a museum exhibit on display nearby? Is there a coffee shop with great cake that you’ve not eaten in a while? Even though it may not be as exciting as living abroad in a brand-new environment, you can still find hidden gems in your own back garden, so go out and explore!

Plan the future!

From my personal experience, the best way to combat reverse culture shock is to plan something exciting in the near future.  For me, this is usually a short trip away from home.  I’m lucky to live in Europe where travel prices are relatively low, especially in winter, so planning spontaneous trips doesn’t need to break the bank.  However, if travel prices are too high, plan a day trip instead!  Or a party, a picnic, a sports game, a bike ride…  anything that you can look forward to and focus energy on planning, so you can look forward to new adventures rather than becoming sad reminiscing over memories of the past.

Hopefully this blog has helped you to learn about the reality of reverse culture shock and will help you to prepare for your return back home.

Get in touch:
Before your stay, How-to Guides

How Much to Budget for Living in China

So, you want to come to China for an internship. You may be wondering, ‘How much money should I budget for daily life in China?’ Well, good news! If spent wisely, your money can get you far. Daily costs are generally inexpensive and you can dine out cheaply compared to other destinations. Food comes at a cheap price, with an average restaurant charging around 20 RMB for a meal. Drinks can also vary with prices but local beers can cost 7 RMB. However, you may want to save up some money when wanting to visit tourist locations and splash out on Western food or BBQs.

For the current exchange rates, please see here. (https://www.xe.com/currency/eur-euro/)

1 GBP = 8.4

1 USD = 6.4

1 AUD = 4.5

1 CAD = 4.9

1 NZD = 4.3

**Exchange rates as of 02/12/2021

Your individual lifestyle is the main factor that will determine your budget. It will vary depending on what transportation you decide to take, personal dining preferences, nightlife and more.

WEEKLY/MONTHLY EXPENSES

Below, we have put together some budget estimates of your expenses in daily life during your time on your internship. In general, you can live on a low budget and still be able to live quite well. For those looking to spend a little more, there are also medium and high budget estimates. See which budget is right for you!

Getting around China is cheap and efficient. Luckily, their public transit is modern and reliable to get around the city but it may get crowded even outside rush hour. Travelling via the bus, taxi and metro are all easy routes depending on where you are in China. For example, in Shanghai the starting price of a taxi may be 14 RMB, however in Chengdu it can be as cheap as 8 RMB. Nevertheless, transport is considerably cheaper than the West.

(For food, all apartments will have kitchens, so you will have the option to cook your own meals.) Food at supermarkets are affordable, but you may find that some discount shops such as Lotte Mart or Walmart will make your money last.

For those looking to save money while still having fun and trying new things.

Expense TypeCost per weekDescription
Transport60 RMBTransport using buses and walking (4 RMB per trip)
Food300 RMBShop at local marts (260 RMB); Lunch out (20 RMB); Dinner out (20 RMB)
Treats200 RMBOne night out with a few drinks and taxi
Extras290 RMBGoing to museums/cinema
Avg weekly850 RMB
Avg monthly3400 RMB

For those who go to the gym, eat out more or spend more in other ways.

Expense TypeCost per weekDescription
Transport80 RMBTransport using subway and buses
Food360 RMBShop at local marts (300 RMB); Lunch and dinner with mix of Asian and Western food (60 RMB)
Treats300 RMBCouple nights out with drinks and taxi
Extras340 RMBGoing to museums/cinema/gym
Avg weekly1080 RMB
Avg monthly4320 RMB

For those who would like to spend more on cocktail bars, taxis or shopping. 

Expense TypeCost per weekDescription
Transport100 RMBUsing subway, buses and taxis everywhere
Food440 RMBShop at western marts (340 RMB); Lunch and dinner with Western food (100 RMB)
Treats390 RMBNights out at classy clubs with drinks and taxi/clothes shopping
Extras480 RMBGoing to museums/cinema/gym membership/individual travel
Avg weekly1410 RMB
Travel1280 RMBGoing on a weekend trip
Avg monthly6920 RMB

As you can see, you don’t need too much money to enjoy life in China. Be careful when you have a craving to buy a western coffee or plan to travel to the more expensive cities. Not everything is cheaper in China, and all the little costs can quite quickly add up. So it’s important to find the right budget for you.

For international payments, we always recommend using TransferWise. They’re cheaper than the banks, because they always use the real exchange rate – which you can check out on Google – and charge a very small fee. They’re also safe and trusted by over 2 million people around the world. You can sign up here. (https://wise.com/?clickref=1011lijaZwQY&partnerID=1100l59541&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=0&adref=&utm_source=pagodaprojects&partnerizecampaignID=1011l727)

Articles en français, Avant le depart

Questions sur mon séjour en Chine – FAQs

Partez-vous bientôt en Chine ? Nous avons regroupé quelques réponses aux questions que vous pourriez nous poser !

  • Faut-il emporter du  liquide en Chine? Quelle est la limite?

Il est préférable d’avoir un peu de liquide en arrivant, environ 380 Euros en Yuan, soit 3000 yuan. Cependant, il sera possible pour vous de retirer de l’argent dans certaines banques Chinoise avec votre carte française, donc inutile d’avoir trop de liquide en arrivant. La limite est de 4000 euros en liquide.

  • Comment retirer de l’argent en Chine? Puis-je utiliser ma carte française dans les banques chinoises?

Certaines banques acceptent les cartes Visa ou Master Card (comme Bank of China, ICBC, China Merchant Bank). Il vous suffira de trouver les distributeurs avec les signes correspondants. Il sera donc facile pour vous de retirer de l’argent ici, avec quelques frais selon les conditions de votre banque.

  • Quel est le taux de change entre l’euro et le yuan chinois?

Le taux de Change entre l’Euro et le Yuan Chinois est d’environ 7,80 Yuan pour 1€ mais ce taux fluctue. Vous pouvez le consulter sur Internet sur des sites comme xe.com, ou vous pouvez télécharger des applications vous permettant de faire la conversion entre Yuan et Euro.

  • Puis-je échanger des euros quand je suis en Chine?

Il est très difficile à présent d’échanger de la monnaie directement en Chine. En effet les démarches administratives sont longues et complexes dans chaque banque, nous ne le recommandons donc pas !

Aéroport
  • Que se passe-t-il à l’immigration à l’aéroport quand j’arrive?

A votre arrivée il vous sera demandé de montrer votre passeport et votre visa. Il vous sera aussi demandé de remplir un papier indiquant votre adresse de séjour, veuillez alors renseigner l’adresse d’InternChina.

  • Comment faire si mes bagages se sont perdus et n’arrivent pas en même temps que moi?

Si cela arrive, pas de panique surtout ! Contacter l’équipe d’InternChina via Wechat pour nous avertir que vous aurez du retard et allez au bureau des réclamations, pour avertir la perte de vos bagages. Renseignez le numéro de téléphone et l’adresse d’InternChina comme contact. Pour plus d’informations, n’hésitez pas à consulter cet article afin d’éviter ce genre de désagrément !

  • Que se passe-t-il après mon arrivée à l’aéroport?

Après votre arrivée à l’aéroport, un membre d’InternChina sera à la sortie vous attendant avec une pancarte avec votre prénom. Cette personne vous remettra un « Welcome pack » avec une carte de transport, une carte SIM pour votre portable, un guide de la ville et d’autres outils qui vous seront bien utiles pour votre séjour. Cette personne sera aussi en charge de vous emmener jusqu’à votre logement, il vous présentera vos colocataires si vous vivez dans un appartement partagé. Lisez cet article en anglais décrivant ce qui vous attend pour vos premiers jours en Chine .

Kit de bienvenue :
  • Qu’est ce que le “Welcome Pack”?

Dans le « Welcome pack » vous trouverez une carte de transport de votre ville avec 20 RMB dessus, une carte SIM pour votre portable, une carte et un guide de votre ville, une carte avec votre adresse du travail et votre adresse écrite en chinois et des goodies InternChina.

Les premiers jours
  • Que se passe-t-il lors des premiers jours en Chine?

Lors de vos premiers jours en Chine, InternChina s’occupe de vous enregistrer auprès des autorités compétentes. InternChina vous organisera une réunion d’orientation au sein de ses locaux, pour vous briefer à propos de la Chine et afin de vous présenter toute l’équipe sur place. Enfin, cela dépendra du jour mais dès votre arrivée vous pourrez participer aux diverses activités que nous organisons comme les dîners du jeudi ou les activités du week-end.

  • Puis-je voyager pendant mon séjour en Chine?

Cela dépend bien sûr de votre entreprise mais les week-ends sont libres et vous permettrons de visiter la ville ou de vous promener en Chine. De plus, InternChina vous proposera des destinations de voyages afin de découvrir d’autres villes. Mais il faut savoir qu’avec votre visa vous ne pourrez pas voyager en dehors de Chine. Vous ne pourrez pas non plus vous rendre à Macao ou Hong-Kong avec votre visa.

Portable ;
  • Ai-je besoin d’un adaptateur pour les prises électriques?

Il n’y’a pas besoin de venir avec un adaptateur, puisque les prises électriques française sont compatibles avec les prises de courant Chinoises.

  • Puis-je utiliser mon téléphone portable en Chine?

Une carte SIM chinoise vous sera fourni, vous pourrez donc utiliser votre téléphone portable. Vérifier tout de fois en arrivant que l’itinérance de vos données à l’étranger soit désactivée si vous avez fait le choix de garder votre forfait téléphonique français afin de ne pas avoir de mauvaise surprise sur votre facture.

  • Quelle est la taille de la carte sim?

La carte SIM peut être utiliser en micro SIM ou en mini SIM il n’y aura donc aucun souci d’adaptabilité.

  • Cette carte sim va-t-elle marcher dans mon téléphone? Est-ce certain?

Il est nécessaire que votre téléphone portable soit désimbloqué tout opérateur.

  • Cette carte permet-elle de passer des coups de fils à l’étranger?

Vous ne pourrez pas utiliser votre numéro Chinois pour passer des appels à l’étranger, car votre forfait ne le permet pas.

  • Comment puis-je contacter mes proches dans ce cas?

De nombreux moyens permettent de rester en contact avec vos proches. Tout d’abord, il est beaucoup plus pratique de demander à vos proches de télécharger l’application WeChat grâce à laquelle ils pourront communiquer avec vous tout le temps. Le logiciel Skype ne requiert pas de VPN et vous permettra de rester en contact avec vos proches. Il vous est aussi possible d’utiliser un VPN afin de vous connecter à vos réseaux sociaux habituels comme Facebook, WhatsApp et autres.

  • Comment recharger ma carte sim ou ma carte de bus en Chine?

Toutes ces démarches peuvent paraître compliqué quand on ne parle pas Chinois mais tout vous sera expliqué lors de votre orientation dans les premiers jours après votre arrivée en Chine.

Internet :
  • C’est quoi un VPN? Lequel utiliser?

Le VPN est un outil qui permet de brouiller votre adresse IP. En d’autres mots, c’est un moyen pour vous d’accéder aux différents sites bloqués en Chine à l’aide de votre ordinateur et même votre téléphone portable. De nombreuses offres de VPN existent, certaines sont payantes. Nous pouvons vous recommander Astrill, ou Express VPN qui sont des outils performants. Mais certains VPN gratuits existent comme, Green VPN, Betternet ou SuperVPN. La connexion sera cependant moins stable.

  • Quelles sont les applications utiles en Chine? Faut-il en télécharger avant d’arriver?

Il est en effet primordial d’avoir WeChat, mais vous l’avez tous déjà télécharger. Pour ce qui est du reste, Baidu Maps (Baidu Ditu – l’équivalent Chinois du Google Maps) vous sera très pratique, mais pas besoin de le télécharger avant d’arriver ici. D’autres applications vous seront utile, telle qu’un convertisseur de devise, ou bien un dictionnaire en ligne comme Pleco qui vous permettra de traduire quelques mots de l’anglais au Chinois. Vous pouvez également télécharger Didi Chuxing (l’équivalent de UBER en chinois).

  • Quels sont les sites internet bloqués en Chine?

Beaucoup de sites sont bloqués en Chine, il est impossible d’accéder à Google, Facebook ou encore YouTube sans VPN, pour une liste plus détaillée veuillez consulter, ce site par exemple : https://lebusinessman.fr/liste-sites-bloques-chine/

Appartements :
  • Y-a-t-il le nécessaire en literie dans l’appartement?

Les appartements sont entièrement meublés et bien équipés. Nous fournissons un oreiller, des draps et des couvertures.

  • Et des serviettes de toilette?

Il vous est demandé d’amener vos propres serviettes, il n’y en a pas sur place.

  • Qu’en est-il des ustensiles de cuisine?

La cuisine est bien équipée, il y’a tout le nécessaire. Si il vous manque des éléments, n’hésitez pas à demander à notre équipe nous avons des réserves!

  • Y-a-t-il un fer à repasser?

Nous avons ces accessoires dans le bureau d’InternChina, si vous en avez besoin. N’hésitez pas à nous en informer pour qu’on puisse vous les fournir.

  • Comment vais-je laver mes vêtements?

Tous les appartements dont nous disposons sont équipés de machine à laver.

  • Dois-je partager ma salle de bain?

Vous allez devoir partager votre salle de bain avec un ou deux autres stagiaires. Certaines chambres seulement bénéficient de leur propre salle de bain, premier arrivé, premier servi!

  • Si il y a un problème dans l’appartement comme une ampoule cassé, comment faire?

Si quelque chose se passe dans votre appartement veuillez en avertir l’équipe d’InternChina, via le groupe WeChat qui sera à votre disposition et qui sera votre lien privilégié avec l’équipe. Ainsi nous viendrons en aide dès que possible. Tout de fois, un état des lieux sera fait au début, pour vérifier que tout fonctionne.

  • Comment régler les factures?

Si vous trouvez une facture bloquée dans votre porte ou que quelqu’un frappe à votre porte pour venir vérifier le compteur électrique, surtout ne paniquez pas. Appelez quelqu’un de l’équipe d’InternChina pour qu’on puisse communiquer avec cette personne, ou bien prenez en photo la facture et faites la nous parvenir via WeChat dans le groupe de votre appartement. Nous nous chargerons de la payer en ligne.

  • Comment faire si je dois recevoir un colis de France?

Si vos parents doivent vous envoyer quelque chose par courrier, veuillez alors renseignez l’adresse d’InternChina, avec notre numéro de téléphone, en cas de problème. Sachez qu’un envoi depuis la France peut mettre très longtemps, nous vous conseillons alors d’utiliser plutôt la Fedex ou DHL, qui seront certainement plus rapide.

Famille d’accueil:
  • Puis-je inviter des amis dans ma famille d’accueil?

Il est préférable de poser ce genre de questions directement à la famille pour éviter tout problèmes éventuels.

  • Comment faire si j’ai des problèmes dans ma famille d’accueil ?

Si vous avez des problèmes avec votre famille d’accueil, il ne faut surtout pas hésitez à nous prévenir ainsi nous serons là pour y remédier.

Vie de tous les jours:
  • Y-a-t-il beaucoup de chinois qui parlent anglais?

Il y’a beaucoup de Chinois qui ne peuvent pas vraiment parler Anglais, cependant nous nous assurons, que votre responsable de Stage puisse parler l’Anglais pour que vous ne soyez pas totalement perdu. Dans les commerces, il est préférable d’apprendre deux ou trois mots, ou d’avoir des applications de traduction comme Pleco. Se faire comprendre n’est pas impossible même sans chinois, puisque les commerçants sont tous équipés de calculette pour vous informer du prix.

  • Comment commander à manger au restaurant si je ne parle pas chinois?

Beaucoup de restaurant Chinois ont des menus avec des photos, ce qui vous permettra de savoir un minimum ce que vous allez commander, sinon vous pouvez toujours pointé la nourriture qu’un autre client à commander ou bien traduire ce que vous voulez grâce à Pleco. Vous pouvez aussi jetez un coup d’œil cet article écrit par une de nos stagiaire qui vous sera bien utile pour mieux comprendre certains caractères chinois.

  • Est-il possible de trouver des restaurants Halal? Comment faire si je suis végétarien ou si j’ai des allergies alimentaires?

Il est en effet possible de trouver de la nourriture Halal en Chine, certains restaurants sont spécialisés dans la nourriture Halal. Si vous êtes végétarien, il sera peut-être au début difficile de penser trouver des plats sans viandes. Rassurez-vous la Chine est tout de même le pays qui a inventé le Toufu, vous pourrez donc toujours trouver des plats sans trace de viandes dans beaucoup de restaurant ! Vous pouvez trouver ici un article écrit par un végétarien . Nous avons aussi beaucoup de conseil à donner si vous chercher des restaurants particuliers. Si vous avez des allergies alimentaires assurez-vous que l’équipe d’InternChina est au courant avant votre arrivée en Chine, ainsi nous vous équiperons avec quelque chose ou il sera inscrit en Chinois vos différentes allergies.

Dans l’entreprise
  • Quand vais-je rencontrer mes collègues?

Lors de votre premier jour de travail, nous serons là pour vous accompagner dans votre entreprise, alors nous vous introduirons auprès de vos collègues.

  • Comment me rendre à mon entreprise tous les jours?

Le premier jour de votre stage nous viendrons vous récupérer chez vous et nous vous emmènerons ainsi vous pourrez savoir comment vous rendre à votre lieu de travail depuis votre logement. De plus, lors de votre réunion d’Orientation dans les locaux d’InternChina, nous vous expliquerons comment vous servir de Baidu Maps qui s’avérera très utile pour vos déplacements dans la ville.

  • Dois-je emporter mon ordinateur?

Oui, pensez a emporter un ordinateur avec vous, vous en aurez certainement besoin pour votre stage. Vous pouvez envoyer un message à votre maître de stage pour confirmation, mais dans la plupart des cas il faudra emporter le votre.

  • Dois-je apporter des cadeaux lors de mon premier jour en entreprise?

Cela n’est pas obligatoire et pas forcément attendu de votre part. Si vous souhaitez vraiment offrir quelque chose de votre pays à vos collègues le geste sera très bien accueilli et vous fera certainement gagner des points auprès de vos collègues. Ne vous offensez pas si ils n’ouvrent pas le cadeau tout de suite, c’est malpoli de l’ouvrir directement en Chine!

  • Y-a-t-il un dress code dans l’entreprise?

Cela dépend bien sûr de l’entreprise dans laquelle vous serez. Je ne peux que vous conseillez de vous habillez le plus classique et formel possible les premiers jours afin de faire bonne impression puis de voir comment vos autres collègues s’habillent.

  • Quels seront mes horaires? Mes temps de pause ?

Ces horaires changent selon l’entreprise dans laquelle vous serez. La plupart des entreprises travaillent de 8 heure jusqu’à 17 heure avec une pause déjeuner d’1h30. Parfois cela peut-être de 9 heure jusqu’à 18 heure. Renseignez-vous lors de votre entretien!.

En cas de problème
  • Que faire si j’ai un problème dans mon entreprise ?

Si vous avez un problème avec votre entreprise ou votre responsable de stage il faudra prévenir l’équipe d’InternChina , comme le manager sur place par exemple et alors nous essayerons au mieux de résoudre les problèmes.

Cours de chinois
  • Puis-je prendre des cours de chinois en plus de mon stage?

Il est tout à fait possible de prendre des cours de Chinois, nous avons d’ailleurs une école partenaire avec laquelle vous pourrez programmer des cours de langue . Si vous êtes un groupe et que vous voudriez prendre les leçons ensemble faites-le-nous savoir afin que nous organisions ça.

Maladie
  • Que faire si je suis malade?

Si vous venez à être malade en Chine, veuillez en informer l’équipe d’InternChina. Nous vous aiderons alors à accéder à des hôpitaux internationaux ou des docteurs sachant parler Anglais pourrons vous aider.

  • Puis-je trouver des médicaments facilement?

Pensez a emporter une quantité suffisante des médicaments dont vous avez besoin pendant votre séjour. Pour les médicaments nous vous conseillons d’emporter une ordonnance, afin d’attester en cas de contrôle qu’ils vous ont été prescrits.

Assurance
  • Comment fonctionne l’assurance?

S’il vous arrive quelque chose en Chine il faut contacter l’équipe d’InternChina sur place. Ils sont disponibles pour vous aider en cas d’urgence. Au niveau de votre remboursement, vous devrez vous rendre au bureau d’InternChina pour remplir le formulaire de demande de remboursement. Nous serons ravis de présenter cette demande de remboursement à la compagnie d’assurance en votre nom. Si toutefois il vous arrivait quelque chose de grave et urgent veuillez contacter l’équipe d’InternChina directement.Si vous ne trouvez pas toutes les réponses à vos questions n’hésitez pas à nous contacter !

Nous avons hâte de vous recevoir en Chine !

How-to Guides

How to Budget for Living in Taipei

So, you want to come to Taipei for an internship. You may be wondering, ‘How much money should I budget for daily life in Taipei?’ Well, good news! If spent wisely, your money can get you far. Daily costs are slightly more expensive compared to other Asian destinations. Food comes at a standard price, with an average restaurant charging around 130 NT$ for a meal. Drinks can also vary with prices, with a local beer costing 57 NT$. However, you may want to save up some money when wanting to visit tourist locations and splash out on Western food.

For the current exchange rates, please see here. (https://www.xe.com/currency/eur-euro/)

1 GBP = 36.9

1 USD = 27.7

1 AUD = 19.7

1 CAD = 21.7

1 NZD = 18.9

**Exchange rates as of 02/12/2021

Your individual lifestyle is the main factor that will determine your budget. It will vary depending on what transportation you decide to take, personal dining preferences, nightlife and more.

WEEKLY/MONTHLY EXPENSES

Below, we have put together some budget estimates of your expenses in daily life during your time on your internship. In general, you can live on a low budget and still be able to live quite well. For those looking to spend a little more, there are also medium and high budget estimates. See which budget is right for you!

Getting around Taipei is a fairly easy task. Luckily, their public transit is affordable and reliable around the city. Travelling via the metro is a tourists’ favourite way of getting around. But there are plenty of other options with buses and bicycles to take you to the city centre.

(For food, all apartments will have kitchens, so you will have the option to cook your own meals.) Food at supermarkets are affordable, but you may find that some discount shops such as Carrefour or Pxmart will make your money last.

For those looking to save money while still having fun and trying new things.

Expense TypeCost per weekDescription
Transport15 NT$Transport using metro (1.10 NT$ per trip)
Food2230 NT$Shop at local marts (2000 NT$); Lunch out (100 NT$); Dinner out (130 NT$)
Treats2500 NT$One night out with a few drinks and taxi
Extras1265 NT$Going to museums/cinema
Avg weekly6010 NT$
Avg monthly24040 NT$

For those who go to the gym, eat out more or spend more in other ways.

Expense TypeCost per weekDescription
Transport30 NT$Transport using metro and buses
Food2600 NT$Shop at local marts (2300 NT$); Lunch and dinner with mix of Asian and Western food (300 NT$)
Treats3500 NT$Couple nights out with drinks and taxi
Extras1730 NT$Going to museums/cinema/gym
Avg weekly7860 NT$
Avg monthly31440 NT$

For those who would like to spend more on cocktail bars, taxis or shopping. 

Expense TypeCost per weekDescription
Transport60 NT$Using metro, cars and taxis everywhere
Food3300 NT$Shop at local marts (2500 NT$); Lunch and dinner with Western food (800 NT$)
Treats4200 NT$Nights out at classy clubs with drinks and taxi/clothes shopping
Extras1950 NT$Going to museums/cinema/gym/individual travel
Avg weekly9510 NT$
Travel5550 NT$Going on a weekend trip
Avg monthly43590 NT$

As you can see, you don’t need too much money to enjoy life in Taipei. Be careful when you have a craving to buy a western coffee or give into temptation of using private taxis to get to work instead of taking the bus. Not everything is cheaper in Taiwan, and all the little costs can quite quickly add up. So it’s important to find the right budget for you.

For international payments, we always recommend using TransferWise. They’re cheaper than the banks, because they always use the real exchange rate – which you can check out on Google – and charge a very small fee. They’re also safe and trusted by over 2 million people around the world. You can sign up here. (https://wise.com/?clickref=1011lijaZwQY&partnerID=1100l59541&utm_medium=affiliate&utm_campaign=0&adref=&utm_source=pagodaprojects&partnerizecampaignID=1011l727)

Certificate of vaccination OMS
Practical Advice

Vaccines For Vietnam – What You Need To Know

While reading this, you are probably getting ready for your internship in Vietnam and checking everything off on your to-do list. Aside from all the usual important stuff you need for going abroad- your passport, visa, medicine, and clothes, you need to think about what vaccines you might need for Vietnam. This blog is here to save you time and will be a helpful guide for you to get over this last step.

Vaccine - Get ready !
Vaccine – Get ready !

This is something you need to consider before starting your adventure in Vietnam, and while vaccines aren’t necessary, you definitely need to speak to your doctor to see what they recommend!

It is recommended that you speak to your General Practitioner at least 6 to 8 weeks before your scheduled flight to discuss any health risks or vaccinations.

It is not necessary to be vaccinated before your arrival in Vietnam, however there are some recommended vaccinations for your stay in Vietnam: Hepatitis A and B, Typhoid, Tetanus-Diphtheria and Measles if you do not already have them.

The boy who receives vaccination
A boy receiving vaccination

 

Ask Yourself

  • What’s the risk of me contracting a vaccine-preventable disease?
  • How long am I going for?
  • What will I be doing?
  • Can I be protected without a vaccine?

What Countries Say

For more information about vaccines, please check the CDC’s website or read some more information here about traveling safely to Vietnam !

Our team is looking forward to meeting you soon in Ho Chi Minh City!

Chengdu Blogs, Chengdu InternChina events, Eating Out in Chengdu

Weekend Trip to Wenshu Monastery

Wenshu Monastery

This weekend in Chengdu our interns took a visit to the famous Wenshu Monastery. Upon arrival, the beauty of the buildings stunned us. From the towering peace pagoda to the stunning halls, the architecture amazed us all.

Wenshu Gardens

Upon entering the monastery, you notice its layout in the traditional Chinese style. Wenshu is made of 5 south facing halls in a row leading up to the stunning main hall at the far end from the entrance. In classic Chinese style there was maintenance underway including this man precariously perched atop scaffolding on wheels using a jet wash to clean the beams.

Maintenance worker at Wenshu Temple

Having toured the grounds of the monastery we headed outside to an antiques market. Here we found old communist memorabilia, including the famous little red book,  and Mao-ist propaganda amongst other treasures. One vendor was sat outside his shop playing his guitar as his dog kept an eye on the passers by.

Antiques Vendor and his watch dog

After looking around the monastery and the antiques market we headed back towards the temple grounds in search of some food.

The Food

The surrounding area to the monastery is home to some of the most famous food in Sichuan. Not ones to miss the opportunity to eat, we jumped in the line of a famous restaurant. The restaurant was packed full with no space to sit. Upon ordering our TianShuiMian (this restaurants famous dish) we managed to find a spot to sit and dug into to this amazing delicacy. Our interns loved the sweet and spicy contrast to these amazing hand made noodles!

TianShuiMian

After sampling this delight we wanted more and headed to another famous spot near the metro station. As is the case with all well-known eateries in China, this place also had a queue out the front. This time we were queuing for Guo Kui. The menu offered Beef, Pork, Pig’s Snout, Pigs Ear, Noodles and other delights to fill this delightful pastry pocket. I personally chose the pig’s snout, which didn’t disappoint.

GuoKui in Chengdu

Having filled our stomachs with great food and our eyes with fantastic scenery we all headed off. On the way back we stopped by Tianfu Square, right in the middle of the city to snap some pictures and take in our surroundings. All in all a great day out!

Interested in visiting Wenshu Monastery and trying some Sichuan cuisine? Apply now!

Dalian Blogs

Dalian Welcomes Anna

Hello! My name is Anna, and I am from Poland. Last week I started my internship with the InternChina Dalian office, as part of the Bookings and Marketing Team.

About Me

I am currently in my third year of Business Management and Chinese at University of Central Lancashire. This year is my year abroad, so I decided to spend it half on studying, half on getting work experience.

My first semester was a Chinese language course at Beijing International Studies University. It was my second time in China, and my second time at BISU! Last year I visited that university for a two weeks long summer language course, and I liked it so much I chose BISU again!

For the work experience part in China, I chose to do my internship with InternChina. As I wanted to put the theory I have learned during my two years of studying into practice, and this internship covers all subjects of my studies, it was the perfect choice!

InternChina - At the Great Wall
InternChina – At the Great Wall

Dalian vs. Beijing

When I was sure that I want to do my internship with InternChina, I found it difficult to decide on which office I should choose!

I chose Dalian because of its location – at the peninsula with a lot of beaches, places for hiking and greenery, and because of its history. Dalian is definitely a very beautiful city with many cultures mixed up, which can be seen in the architecture and food.

Because of Russian and Japanese occupations, Dalian has many buildings and public places in the style of those countries. Beijing is much more homogeneous in style, thus it has more developed areas with new Western-style buildings along with suburban areas with old, grey and boring blocks.

Food in Dalian is very influenced by Korean, Japanese and Russian cuisine. I really love that variety. But the main cooking style is Shandong cuisine, with the influence of North-Eastern Chinese cuisine. This means there is a huge choice of seafood from casual fish and prawns to more sophisticated (at least for Westerners!) dishes like sea cucumber or sea urchins.

What I really like in Dalian is that it is a much less busy and crowded city than Beijing. On the streets there are much fewer people and cars, and the queues in shops are shorter.

Differences in Beijing and Dalian

One big difference between Beijing and Dalian is the subway link. I am used to travelling everywhere by Beijing subway as it is the most convenient and foreigner-friendly means of transport. On the train, you can see a board with stations in Chinese characters and Pinyin, and which station the train is approaching as well as hearing the announcement in both Chinese and English.

The Dalian subway is not that well-developed, and my apartment is not located near any metro station. But do I have a bus stop very close to my house with busses leaving every couple of minutes. The announcements are all in Chinese, so I have an opportunity to perfect my Chinese listening skills!

I have already fallen in love with the winter scenery of Dalian, with snow and all the colourful lights on buildings at night. However, I am really looking forward to warm days to explore Dalian’s most beautiful places and learn more about culture and history of that city!

If you want to be a part of the InternChina story, why not apply now!

Chengdu Blogs, Chengdu Business, Chengdu InternChina events, Eating Out in Chengdu

Internship Experience – Sylvia in Chengdu

Written by Sylvia Liu 
It’s been a bit over a month now since I first began my internship experience in Chengdu with InternChina, and I can easily say that this experience is definitely one that will be remembered!

The City

Having travelled to many other Chinese cities before, Chengdu is a breath of fresh air; not literally however, but rather in the sense of its pace of life.

Chengdu meanders peacefully through each day; while other cities rush and are filled with spontaneity. That’s not to say Chengdu is less developed economically, quite the contrary! Just as its numerous shopping centres, nightlife and still expanding public transport systems like to prove.

Chengdu Panda Research Panda Base

Personally I have found the pace of life charming. I have enjoyed spending my Sundays temple-seeing, sipping tea at monasteries, and nibbling on sunflower seeds while listening to the indistinct chatter of Sichuanese.

Food has also held a prominent role in my time here! You will be hard pressed to find a restaurant who won’t serve at least a bowl of chilli with the famous Sichuan Peppercorns along with your meal.

Internship experience and exploring Chengdu

The old streets of Chengdu, the majority located in the inner South West of the city, are a delight to walk through. There is plenty of opportunity to snack on the delicious street food, while being surrounded by traditional architecture permeating with historical significance.

The Internship

I believe that there is knowledge that can only be learned from doing an internship in China. In particular cultural proficiency, which is always a handy skill to have even if one does not pursue a career in international business.

Some of the more interesting tasks I’ve done at the company have included researching the potential of incorporating blockchain technology with gaming, as well as game testing for current beta projects.

The employees at the company are all very inclusive, and it is interesting to gain insight into general Chinese organisational culture. The food options available at lunch are an additional highlight of the workday. The local 7-Eleven is frequented often for its lunchtime pick-and-mix boxes!

Intern activities

The People

The people I have met in Chengdu have been the best part of my internship yet. Being able to meet people from all over the world through my internship in Chengdu is something I’m grateful for. I always look forward to spending time with the other interns or going to events organised by InternChina, such as Thursday Dinner, or even weekend activities outside the city.

InternChina Chengdu Thursday dinner

I can say with no doubt that it is the people I have met here that make this trip the enjoyable experience it has been!

Interested in seeing everything that Sylvia has during her time in Chengdu? Then apply now!

Cultural, Internship Experience, Learn about China, Understanding Business in China

Hear It From the Companies: Guanxi & Mianzi

Congratulations! You have acquired an internship in China! By now, you must have researched all about how to successfully communicate and work with your soon to be Chinese co-workers. Through the research you have gathered, you must have read about “face’’ and “guanxi’’ a lot. Well, here’s a bit more, with tips and advice from two of  our partnered companies here in China!

What is Guanxi or Mianzi?

Here is a quick introduction for those that don’t know these two concepts. Guanxi, or “relationships,” is used to describe relationships in their many forms. These can be between friends, families, or businesses.

You can read more about the concept of guanxi from James here, but it is absolutely essential to conducting business and succeeding in China.

Mianzi or “face”, explained here, is so important in Chinese social, political,  and business circles that it can literally make or break a deal! It can be translated as “honour”, “reputation” and “respect,” and the concepts are deeply rooted in the Chinese culture.

So how do you achieve Guanxi and Mianzi??

There are a few ways you can better your guanxi and gain some mianzi- read some comments from our partnered companies on how best to do it!

“Be open-minded, curious, and prepared!” – Marketing firm

The lifestyle and the business environment in China is different than it is in the West, so have an open mind for your new lifestyle here in China. You need to try being patient and understanding of your new cultural surroundings and work with potential language barriers.

Be Curious

Ask lots of questions while you are at your internship! Don’t worry about bothering your new co-workers, they want to help you, so ask away!

You should also engage in conversations while you are at social events, such as dinners, with your coworkers- this a great way of building your “guanxi!” However, you should remember to keep your questions reasonable and appropriate for the situation. You don’t want to ask any questions which might embarrass or cause your coworkers to lose face themselves.

Be Prepared 

Even though you might not know much about China in general, the city you are in, or the language, you can always do a bit of research to show you care enough to learn. This might mean doing some research before you visit, and continuing to ask questions and engage while you are there.

“Offer to buy dinner or go out to eat, and asking for help with and opinions on your work.” – Education company

interns-out-to-lunch-with-their-Mandarin-teacher-build-guanxi

But this doesn’t need to be anything fancy! Even something simple such as grabbing some nice dumplings or noodles at lunch can do the trick. Spending some quality time with your co-workers will be good for your guanxi and networking, and for your daily working life! If your coworkers ask you out for dinner after a long day of work, take the chance and enjoy a good meal and conversations- you will build your guanxi, mianzi and social circle!

Finally, ask for help when you need it. This is still an internship! You aren’t expected to know everything, so don’t be afraid to ask for advice when you don’t know something. Asking a colleague will show you are engaged and interested in the work, and they will appreciate sharing their knowledge of the task with you and gain face. It’s as great to earn as it is to give face!

Feeling ready for that internship now? Best of luck and enjoy your time in China!

Don’t have an internship yet? Check out 5 reasons why you should get one in China!