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Cultural, Travel, Understanding Business in China, Weekend Trips

Travelling in and around China: Japan

China – the Kingdom of the middle- had a wide influence in Asia. In almost every neighboring  country of China you can still find traces of Chinese Civilization from hundreds of years ago. However, you can also discover external influences in Chinese culture – customs, habits, products or even whole lifestyles have been imported from abroad and been integrated into Modern Chinese Culture. One of those neighboring countries which China always had a very special relationship to, is Japan. I had the chance to get a return flight for only 3.000,- RMB to Tokyo so I took advantage of it and explored a beautiful and fascinating place not far from China.

InternChina - at Chengdu airport
InternChina – at Chengdu airport

Even though, Japan is geographically located close to China, the cultures are differing a lot from each other. As a German I can see the parallels rather between Japanese and Germans… but then on the other hand, there are a lot of concepts and ideas which are shared by the Japanese and the Chinese and make them very similar from a Western perspective!

To give you an idea of similarities and differences between Japanese and Chinese Culture, I want to share my experiences and observations with you.

InternChina - Park in Tokyo inspired by Chinese Daoists
InternChina – Park in Tokyo inspired by Chinese Daoists
InternChina - only in Asia
InternChina – only in Asia
japanese nightlife
japanese nightlife

Traffic: A lot of foreigners perceive Chinese traffic as more chaotic than organized (see our blog: http://internchina.com/surviving-in-chinese-traffic/). When I arrived in Tokyo, it was the complete opposite picture. Even though, more people seem to use public transportation at the same time, everything was very organized, calm and people act very polite. For Chinese people it seems normal to use their elbows, don’t cover their mouths when they are coughing or sneezing in public and shout into their mobile phone on any possible occasion – Japanese people prefer their little space around themselves, nobody talks on the phone in the subway and avoid under any circumstance to run into each other even if it is crowded. It was very interesting to see that crowded doesn’t necessarily mean chaotic.
***Be aware though, that in Japan cars go on the left side of the street!

InternChina - organized traffic in Japan
InternChina – organized traffic in Japan
InternChina - friendly reminder in Tokyo subway
InternChina – friendly reminder in Tokyo subway

Language: Japanese on the first glance seems to be much easier than Chinese because you don’t have any tones that you need to take care of. If you know Chinese, you already can read a good part of the Japanese characters (not the pronounciation though, but you can guess the meaning!) which is very helpful in a country which is not using Latin letters. However, on a long-run mastering Japanese language seems to become a lot more complicated and rather difficult to master as grammatical rules are similarly difficult to German grammar. If you want to make quick progress on speaking learning Chinese seems to be the better choice (see our blog: http://internchina.com/china-vs-europe-reasons-to-learn-chinese-in-china/).

InternChina - studying Chinese
InternChina – studying Chinese

Saving/Losing face: Being in China for three years now gave me confidence to understand the idea of saving or losing face. For many westerners it is something very difficult to grasp and accept as a part of the Eastern Culture. It means a lot of rules, such as avoiding to name problems, not to negate or refuse anything directly or using a very flowery language. In business situations this can cause a lot of misunderstandings if you don’t understand these rules or are not be able to read between the lines. Japanese seem to follow this concept to an even further extent  than the Chinese, so I can imagine that for Westerners doing business in Japan is even more difficult to adapt to than doing Business in China. More about cross-cultural communication: http://internchina.com/cross-cultural-communication-in-china-west-vs-east/.

Eating and drinking: Japan offers a wide variety of traditional Japanese dishes, but also international influences can be found. There are many restaurants offering fusion kitchen and the Japanese interpretation of “Western Food”. Very similar to Chinese food, you can offer several dishes, which you can share with your friends. Of course, the best way is to get up very early in the morning and enjoy the freshest sushi in the world at the Tokyo fish market. However, excellent sea-food can be found in China as well – especially in coastal cities (e.g. Qingdao) sea-food will be offered and is part of traditional dishes. In the West we hold the prejudice, Chinese and Japanese wouldn’t drink a lot as they are lacking an enzyme to process alcohol. It is true, that the digestion/processing for a lot of Asians is difficult, but that doesn’t keep them away from consuming good amounts of beer (e.g. Asahi in Japan, Tsingtao-Beer in China) and rice wine (Baijiu in China, Sake in Japan). “Cheers” sounds very similar in Japanese (“Kanpai”) and Chinese (“Ganbei”). More info about eating and drinking customs in Asia: http://internchina.com/how-to-say-bon-appetit-in-chinese/.

InternChina - sharing Chinese food
InternChina – sharing Chinese food
great japanese food
great japanese food
sushi and sashimi
sushi and sashimi

Religion/Beliefs:  Chinese traditional beliefs are rooted in Confucianism, Daoism and the Buddhism which originally came from India to China. Japanese are traditionally Zen-Buddhists and Shintoists. Shintoists believe in “kami” (= spirits) which live in every tree, stone, house etc. Animism is a big part of Shintoism, which means, that each animal has its own spirit. That’s why you can find in Japan numerous parks with temples and shrines where people can pray to certain spirits. In China, there are only a few places left where Daoists and Buddhists can practice their traditional beliefs, modern culture dictates a very practical approach of practicing Buddhist and Daoist traditions. I was very fascinated by the parallels between Daoist beliefs and Shintoism. In both beliefs,  unity and harmony of humans and animals and nature in general play a significant role. Each country though developed their own interpretation of a universal truth. More about Daoism: http://internchina.com/a-visit-to-qingyang-temple-back-to-the-roots-of-daoism/.

InternChina - Daoist temple in Chengdu
InternChina – Daoist temple in Chengdu
InternChina - Shinto shrine for Rackoon dogs in the middle of Tokyo
InternChina – Shinto shrine for Rackoon dogs in the middle of Tokyo
InternChina - beautiful Garden in Japan InternChina - beautiful Garden in Japan
InternChina – beautiful Garden in Japan
InternChina – beautiful Garden in Japan

All in all it was a very interesting trip to Japan and I am sure to come back at a later point to enjoy the blossom of the Sakura trees (cherry trees) as it is said to be one of the most beautiful events in the world!

If you are interested in Eastern Culture, try an internship in China and see if you are ready for exploring the rest of Asia! Apply now and get a great internship in Qingdao, Chengdu or Zhuhai!

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InternChina News, Qingdao Blogs

Back to Qingdao!

Hello everyone, my name is Jonathan I’m Intern China’s new Marketing intern, I just arrived in Qingdao and here is some information about me:

InternChina – Jona

I’m 22 years old and I’m French, I come from the eastern part of France namely the region Alsace (near German and Swiss borders). I am student in a master degree at the Université de Haute Alsace (University of Upper Alsace) in Mulhouse France.
My master degree is called MIC-AI (Management Interculturel et Affaires Internationales/Intercultural Management and International Business).

Three years ago I achieved an internship in Qingdao thanks to Intern China, they found me a company and a guest family. I really enjoyed this first China experience, so I decided to come back for my 6 months internship.

I immediately felt like home when I came back last week, my colleagues directly accepted me. Intern China is like a huge family. Having so good relationships is very important when you are far away from home.

During my free time I like reading books, practice sports. In 2010, I spent two weeks in Shanghai and I visited the World Expo.

I am really happy to be here again and I’m sure that I will have a great time in Qingdao ! 🙂

If you want to meet Jonathan please send us your application via email or apply directly through our website

Cultural, Understanding Business in China

Lucky and Unlucky Numbers in China

Have you ever wondered why they chose and fought hard to be the host of the Olympic 2008? they started the opening ceremony on August 8, 2008 at 8:08? It is because the number 8 is a lucky number for them and they believe it will bring good luck to their players if they start the Olympics on that date. Are you interested yet, come on now we will take a look at lucky and unlucky numbers in Chinese culture.

Lucky or Unlucky Chinese Numbers

• One means loneliness, beginning, masculine. One has a thrusting energy that surges forth new growth and potential.
• Two is considered a good number in Chinese culture because There is a Chinese saying: “good things come in pairs”. They always use double things to emphasize things as well, like double happiness
• Three is also a lucky number for them as this is similar to the character of birth.
• Four is an unlucky number and it means death. In East Asia, some buildings do not have a 4th floor. (Compare with the Western practice of some buildings not having a 13th floor because 13 is considered unlucky.) In Hong Kong, some high-rise residential buildings omit all floor numbers with “4”, e.g. 4, 14, 24, 34 and all 40–49 floors, in addition to not having a 13th floor. As a result, a building whose highest floor is number 50 may actually have only 35 physical floors.
• Five — this is a lucky number and is usually link to the five elements which are wood, earth water fire and metal. This number is usually linked to the Emperor of China as well and the Tienanmen gate. “A great practice to familiarize ourselves with the Chinese number five is to adopt the founding five Chinese blessings like Wealth– Happiness– Longevity — Luck and Prosperity. “
• Six — The number six usually means fluidity — blessings and it is good for business, unlike in the Western world where we don’t like the number six, in Chinese culture it is a lucky number. “When we contemplate the meaning of number six in our lives we are contemplating the perennial mysteries of life contained in celestial power– cosmic focus and the cyclical nature of time.
• Seven — This is an unlucky number in Chinese. It is considered ghostly. The seventh month of the Chinese calendar is also called the “Ghost Month”. Activities during the month would include preparing ritualistic food offerings, burning incense, and burning joss paper, a papier-mâché form of material items such as clothes, gold and other fine goods for the visiting spirits of the ancestors. Elaborate meals (often vegetarian meals) would be served with empty seats for each of the deceased in the family treating the deceased as if they are still living During the month, the gates of hell are said to be open so ghosts and spirits are permitted to visit the living realm
• Eight — This is their favourite number aside from nine and simply means prosperity. It is interesting to note that words and the number are similar – number eight and wealth. The value of eight is also linked with Buddhism — the Lotus flower with eight petals.
• Nine– is the biggest of single numbers and it connotes the “Emperor of China” — his robes are with nine dragons on it. Nine is a lucky number for Chinese because it connotes longevity, happiness and good luck.
Some more interesting facts about the number 8
• The Olympics in Beijing kicked off in August 8, 2008 at 8 pm, 8 minutes and 8 seconds after 8 pm.
• A Chinese man offered to sell his license plate number — A88888 for USD164,000
• A number of a telephone with all eight digits on it was sold for 270, 723 in Chengdu, China.
• The Petronas Twin Towers in Malaysia each have 88 Floors.
• The minivan that GM makes for the Chinese market is called the Buick GL8, but the minivans it sold in other countries didn’t have that name.
• The Air Canada route from Shanghai to Toronto is Flight AC88.
• The KLM route from Hong Kong to Amsterdam is Flight KL888.