Baijiu

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Chengdu Office visits International Food and Drinks Fair

Last Friday we visited one our interns at work – we went to the “Chengdu Food and Drinks Fair”. It is the largest fair of its kind in China and brings together hundreds of different wine dealers, beer/spirit companies and food chains here in Chengdu. It was also a very good opportunity for Western beer and spirits companies to enhance their visibility on the Chinese market. The fair was really, really big and for us, from the Chengdu office, it felt that something was definitely going down in the city. The streets were much busier than usual.

InternChina - International Food and Drinks Fair
InternChina – International Food and Drinks Fair

Luckily, Niels invited us to his company’s stall at the “Chengdu Food and Drinks Fair”. Niels comes from the Netherlands and he is currently doing an internship with a German wine producer, selling German wine in Chengdu. He’s obviously learnt a lot during his internship as he could explain to us what kind of wine we were drinking, how it was produced, and why it was special and so on. So here we are in front of his company’s stand.

InternChina - Niels' Stall
InternChina – Niels’ Stall

Having tasted some really enjoyable wines with Niels, we decided to walk around the fair. There were quite a few different foreign wine and beer companies from France and Germany. Although the beer they offered was rather standard, we were able to have a sip of each beer at mostly every stall we passed, so it was quite a pleasant visit!

The most interesting part for us was checking out the Chinese companies and how their alcohols differed from European wines and spirits. At one stand, there was a company that sold rice wine which tasted of cheese (well, it reminded us of cheese anyway). So that was actually a rather strange experience…. In yet another hall there were only baijiu companies. From my experience, I only know people who love baijiu or plainly hate the stuff. I am actually from the minority of (young Western) people who enjoy drinking baijiu whilst having Chinese dishes in the evening. So I had a decent sip of Moutai, which is considered to be one of the best baijius of China.

InternChina - Tim drinking cheese mijiu
InternChina – Tim drinking cheese mijiu

Finally, we let Niels continue with work at the wine stand and headed back home. It was a really nice experience to see both “Western” spirits as well as Chinese drinks all in one place, and to see the differences between them – both in terms of presentation and taste. The next “Chengdu Food and Drinks Fair” is held in spring next year – so if you are interested in doing an internship with a company that is also joining “Chengdu Food and Drinks Fair”, we are happy to arrange an internship for you! Apply Now!

Before your stay, Chengdu Blogs, Chengdu Nightlife

Chinese Rice Wine

China is famous for its traditional drinks and foods, especially in Sichuan where the food is notoriously spicy. China has a real knack of promoting and demoting local ingredients and local cuisine. Sichuan locals will laude their spices and complain about the salty food in the north. Vice versa, Chinese northerners complain about the sweet foods of the south and oily foods of the west, but shout loud and proud about their traditional ways of cooking. Chinese rice wine however, is something that can be appreciated by all the Chinese and us foreigners too!

InternChina - Chinese Rice wine
InternChina – Chinese Rice wine

A lot of tourists, expats and students who pass through or live in Chengdu also learn about the punchy Chinese white wine (白酒), with an average alcohol content of 50% and above, it is not for the faint of heart! It is sometimes said that because of its clarity, Chinese white wine is the vodka of the east. Yet, baijiu is much, much stronger. Indeed, only three summers ago I sampled homemade white wine from a farmer in southern Sichuan. I ended up sleeping in a cabbage field and I was drunk for two days!

InternChina - Chinese Baijiu - Not for the faint of heart
InternChina – Chinese Baijiu – Not for the faint of heart

Far less people have heard of Sichuan’s rice wine. I’m not talking about Sake or the Shaoxing wine used in the cooking of Chinese cuisines. I’m talking about the sweet, sometimes syrupy alcohol that goes with the Chinese food. With an average alcohol content of 15-20%, it’s much more enjoyable and perfect if you’re not a beer fan!

As a finished product, rice wine goes under many names as vendors choose to add local ingredients, and style their own product on the taste of the area.  All rice wines however are made from gluttonous rice 江米, the same stuff you see in zongzi (粽子) eaten during the dragon boat festival.  Rice wine is usually served in little clay urns, sealed at the top with red cloth with the waxy skin of the wine.  It is drunk out of small porcelain bowls. Another important thing is that rice wine can be served cold. Unlike sake or soju, rice wine can be served with ice, making it a perfect summer drink!

InternChina - Chinese rice wine urns
InternChina – Chinese rice wine urns

To experience the heart of Sichuanese culture, it is important to try rice wine. Even though every provinces’ palates vary, and northerners scorn the sissy sweet alcohols of the south. The key to understanding Sichuan is through the stomach. Or out the stomach, if you down too much! Rice wine as a sneaky way of creeping up on you, especially when you’re drinking from tiny cups and relishing the sweet sugary flavour.

InternChina - niushikou mijiu - the place to drink it
InternChina – niushikou mijiu – the place to drink it

If you want to know where to drink Chinese rice wine with your friends, or for more fun city facts in Zhuhai, Chengdu and Qingdao; check out InternChina’s facebook page!

Become an intern now and experience genuine Chinese culture! Apply now!

 

 

Sources:

https://img2.oldkids.cn/upload/260787000/u260786629/2013/08/23/blog_20130823171521856915.jpg

https://blog.sciencenet.cn/blog-507127-634246.html

https://www.wccdaily.com.cn/shtml/hxdsb/20130111/58805.shtml

Cultural, Travel, Understanding Business in China, Weekend Trips

Travelling in and around China: Japan

China – the Kingdom of the middle- had a wide influence in Asia. In almost every neighboring  country of China you can still find traces of Chinese Civilization from hundreds of years ago. However, you can also discover external influences in Chinese culture – customs, habits, products or even whole lifestyles have been imported from abroad and been integrated into Modern Chinese Culture. One of those neighboring countries which China always had a very special relationship to, is Japan. I had the chance to get a return flight for only 3.000,- RMB to Tokyo so I took advantage of it and explored a beautiful and fascinating place not far from China.

InternChina - at Chengdu airport
InternChina – at Chengdu airport

Even though, Japan is geographically located close to China, the cultures are differing a lot from each other. As a German I can see the parallels rather between Japanese and Germans… but then on the other hand, there are a lot of concepts and ideas which are shared by the Japanese and the Chinese and make them very similar from a Western perspective!

To give you an idea of similarities and differences between Japanese and Chinese Culture, I want to share my experiences and observations with you.

InternChina - Park in Tokyo inspired by Chinese Daoists
InternChina – Park in Tokyo inspired by Chinese Daoists
InternChina - only in Asia
InternChina – only in Asia
japanese nightlife
japanese nightlife

Traffic: A lot of foreigners perceive Chinese traffic as more chaotic than organized (see our blog: https://internchina.com/surviving-in-chinese-traffic/). When I arrived in Tokyo, it was the complete opposite picture. Even though, more people seem to use public transportation at the same time, everything was very organized, calm and people act very polite. For Chinese people it seems normal to use their elbows, don’t cover their mouths when they are coughing or sneezing in public and shout into their mobile phone on any possible occasion – Japanese people prefer their little space around themselves, nobody talks on the phone in the subway and avoid under any circumstance to run into each other even if it is crowded. It was very interesting to see that crowded doesn’t necessarily mean chaotic.
***Be aware though, that in Japan cars go on the left side of the street!

InternChina - organized traffic in Japan
InternChina – organized traffic in Japan
InternChina - friendly reminder in Tokyo subway
InternChina – friendly reminder in Tokyo subway

Language: Japanese on the first glance seems to be much easier than Chinese because you don’t have any tones that you need to take care of. If you know Chinese, you already can read a good part of the Japanese characters (not the pronounciation though, but you can guess the meaning!) which is very helpful in a country which is not using Latin letters. However, on a long-run mastering Japanese language seems to become a lot more complicated and rather difficult to master as grammatical rules are similarly difficult to German grammar. If you want to make quick progress on speaking learning Chinese seems to be the better choice (see our blog: https://internchina.com/china-vs-europe-reasons-to-learn-chinese-in-china/).

InternChina - studying Chinese
InternChina – studying Chinese

Saving/Losing face: Being in China for three years now gave me confidence to understand the idea of saving or losing face. For many westerners it is something very difficult to grasp and accept as a part of the Eastern Culture. It means a lot of rules, such as avoiding to name problems, not to negate or refuse anything directly or using a very flowery language. In business situations this can cause a lot of misunderstandings if you don’t understand these rules or are not be able to read between the lines. Japanese seem to follow this concept to an even further extent  than the Chinese, so I can imagine that for Westerners doing business in Japan is even more difficult to adapt to than doing Business in China. More about cross-cultural communication: https://internchina.com/cross-cultural-communication-in-china-west-vs-east/.

Eating and drinking: Japan offers a wide variety of traditional Japanese dishes, but also international influences can be found. There are many restaurants offering fusion kitchen and the Japanese interpretation of “Western Food”. Very similar to Chinese food, you can offer several dishes, which you can share with your friends. Of course, the best way is to get up very early in the morning and enjoy the freshest sushi in the world at the Tokyo fish market. However, excellent sea-food can be found in China as well – especially in coastal cities (e.g. Qingdao) sea-food will be offered and is part of traditional dishes. In the West we hold the prejudice, Chinese and Japanese wouldn’t drink a lot as they are lacking an enzyme to process alcohol. It is true, that the digestion/processing for a lot of Asians is difficult, but that doesn’t keep them away from consuming good amounts of beer (e.g. Asahi in Japan, Tsingtao-Beer in China) and rice wine (Baijiu in China, Sake in Japan). “Cheers” sounds very similar in Japanese (“Kanpai”) and Chinese (“Ganbei”). More info about eating and drinking customs in Asia: https://internchina.com/how-to-say-bon-appetit-in-chinese/.

InternChina - sharing Chinese food
InternChina – sharing Chinese food
great japanese food
great japanese food
sushi and sashimi
sushi and sashimi

Religion/Beliefs:  Chinese traditional beliefs are rooted in Confucianism, Daoism and the Buddhism which originally came from India to China. Japanese are traditionally Zen-Buddhists and Shintoists. Shintoists believe in “kami” (= spirits) which live in every tree, stone, house etc. Animism is a big part of Shintoism, which means, that each animal has its own spirit. That’s why you can find in Japan numerous parks with temples and shrines where people can pray to certain spirits. In China, there are only a few places left where Daoists and Buddhists can practice their traditional beliefs, modern culture dictates a very practical approach of practicing Buddhist and Daoist traditions. I was very fascinated by the parallels between Daoist beliefs and Shintoism. In both beliefs,  unity and harmony of humans and animals and nature in general play a significant role. Each country though developed their own interpretation of a universal truth. More about Daoism: https://internchina.com/a-visit-to-qingyang-temple-back-to-the-roots-of-daoism/.

InternChina - Daoist temple in Chengdu
InternChina – Daoist temple in Chengdu
InternChina - Shinto shrine for Rackoon dogs in the middle of Tokyo
InternChina – Shinto shrine for Rackoon dogs in the middle of Tokyo
InternChina - beautiful Garden in Japan InternChina - beautiful Garden in Japan
InternChina – beautiful Garden in Japan
InternChina – beautiful Garden in Japan

All in all it was a very interesting trip to Japan and I am sure to come back at a later point to enjoy the blossom of the Sakura trees (cherry trees) as it is said to be one of the most beautiful events in the world!

If you are interested in Eastern Culture, try an internship in China and see if you are ready for exploring the rest of Asia! Apply now and get a great internship in Qingdao, Chengdu or Zhuhai!

If you like this blog, please don’t forget to share it through your social networks with your friends!

Chengdu Blogs, Things To Do in Chengdu, Weekend Trips

DuJiangYan and 72 hours in Chengdu

Chengdu has recently launched 72 hour visa-free travel to the city, joining cities such as Shanghai and Beijing. Whist 72 hours might not sound long it certainly offers those heading between Australasia and Europe a nice option for a short city break. Chengdu might be famed for hot girls, hotter food and of course that adorable national symbol – the Panda but I would argue it offers far more than these stereotypes suggest.

InternChina - DuJiangYan
InternChina – DuJiangYan

This weekend I was lucky enough to be invited by Chengdu Daily and the Chengdu Tourism Board to visit DuJiangYan around a 2 hour drive from downtown Chengdu to show much can be seen in a relatively short time. So despite very British weather conditions we headed off to see one of the greatest engineering projects ever created in China.

InternChina - Interview in chengdu
InternChina – Interview

Dujiangyan is an irrigation infrastructure built in 256 BC by the Kingdom of Qin. Located in the Min River in Sichuan province, China, it is still in use today to irrigate over 5,300 square kilometers of land in the region. Making it directly responsible for the abundant and delicious crops grown in the Sichuan basin. DuJiangYan was mastermined by Qin governor Li Bing who investigated the problem of constant flooding and drought in the region and devised a strategy to counter this problem allowing irrigation for the Sichuan Basin to remain at the right level for thousands of years to come.

chinese Fan Dancing
InternChina – Fan Dancing

I was impressed by the scale of the project especially the strategy used to cut through the mountain. First the rocks were heated and then cold water was poured over them to make them easier to cut away. Every 10 years they need to work on the whole engineering project and whilst now you can see modern technology being used it must of been much harder all those years ago!

Work being done on DuJaingYan
Work being done on DuJaingYan

After lunch and a few shots of fruit-infused Baijiu (Chinese very strong alcohol) we took a walk around the vast project, across a few wobbly bridges before returning to the warmth of the bus and returning back to Chengdu.

So how would I recommend 72 hours in Chengdu? Day 1 go and see the city’s most famous residents the Giant Panda and then take the afternoon to chill with some tea (or get your ears cleaned) in People’s Park before spending a night people-watching, shopping and eating snacks in the pedestrianized shopping district of Chunxi Lu. Day 2 take a trip to Emei ShanLeshan or DuJiangYan before returning to enjoy a night at one of the cities’ many local bars, live music venues or the world famous Lan Kwai Feng nightclubbing destination. Onto Day 3 and why not visit historic Jingli and the narrow and wide alleys offer a nice change of pace before going for Hot-Pot and enjoying a night at the Sichuan Opera. Day 4…ok so 72 hours is not long enough for Chengdu but it certainly offers a nice option for those transiting in Asia who fancy a taste of China without any visa hassle.

 If you would like to visit Leshan, Emei Shan or DuJiangYan, apply now and join us in Chengdu! 

Cultural, Travel

Inner Mongolia Trip: 30th of September to the 6th of October: Part II

Inner Mongolia Trip: 30th of September to the 6th of October

InternChina - China map - Inner Mongolia
InternChina – China map – Inner Mongolia

——————————

More information on travelling to Inner Mongolia :

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/searchResult?q=inner+mongolia&facet=origin%3Athorntree_thread

Where to find friends to go with you on an Epic Adventure : https://www.internchina.com/zh/contact/apply

——————————

 

Hello everyone,

My name is Philippe Touzin and I am the Marketing and Graduate Recruitment Manager for InternChina. I am based in the city of Zhuhai and this is the second part to my blog on travelling to Big Sky Country: Inner Mongolia (China).

Part I: https://internchina.com/inner-mongolia-trip-30th-of-september-to-the-6th-of-october-part-i/

 

Gallery of the Inner Mongolia Trip

 

2/10/2013-Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Province – Grass Plains

8:00am: Breakfast and then we went for a Hike in the grass plains, walked up some hills, saw some Lama Buddhism stone prayer “temples” and flags , herd of horses, sheep and endless plains- we took some photo shoots and then went back to our farm for lunch. The afternoon was Mongolian Bow and Arrow training/shooting session, followed by horse riding.

 

InternChina - Prayer flags + Skull on grass plains
InternChina – Prayer flags + Skull on grass plains
InternChina - John Pitts, Dulung, Joseph Fry, Maxime Dupuis, Philippe Touzin
InternChina – John Pitts, Dulung, Joseph Fry, Maxime Dupuis, Philippe Touzin

The horse riding was not part of the tour, and cost 150.-rmb per hour, so we went out for 3hours and rode around with our guides. We all came back feeling like Mongolian Men with sore asses, and the best part was when John Pitts fell of his horse- I didn’t get to see the fall, but Max’s description and the thought of it got us all laughing for about 2hours! (John Pitts: Product design/production manager for a design and manufacturing firm that supplies the top MNE’s in the world with highest quality electronic goods/ accessories)

 

InternChina - riding horses - Joseph fry and Dulung
InternChina – riding horses – Joseph fry and Dulung

We had a rest and then dinner again (stew of potatoes, mutton, mutton ribs,…) which was cooked by the wife of the farmer- followed by copious amounts of Horse milk alcohol (sour horse milk + extra baijiu!) and beer, and more card games in the yurt.

 

Baijiu: Chinese alcohol, usualy over 60%!

 

On our way back from the farm to our yurt, I met the Grandfather/owner  (Mongolian name: Nasan Oqir- 70 years old ) of the lands who invited me for some beers together. He was very cool and explained that his father had built this house and his livestock consisted of:

-300 sheep

-60 horses- which he herds riding his motorbike from sunrise to sunset, every day.

-30  chicken

-2 dogs

-1 cat

-2 rabbits

-and 2500 sqkm of land!!

He wakes up every day before sunrise, rides his motorbike to the neighboring farm (15km) where his best friend lives,… drink some horse milk alcohol together, have breakfast and then gets to work- He offered me a job working for him and honestly it was very tempting!!!

 

 

InternChina - Horse herder landowner Nasan Oqir with Philippe Touzin
InternChina – Horse herder landowner Nasan Oqir with Philippe Touzin

Dulung came to save me before he took out more Baijiu and I returned with him (quite drunk already) to keep partying with my friends. At some point in the night-when we finished all our alcohol, we went out in the plains with all our blankets (temperature: 10 degree Celsius) and lay down to star gaze- Amazing!!

Dulung was quite drunk and passed out, so we ended up having to carry him back to the Yurt, by creating a human King Chair which ended in  a few falls and lots of giggles.

 

3/10/2013-Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Province – Grass Plains

9:00am: breakfast (we had the same staple Mongolian food every morning- Rice with mutton soup + warm horse milk- and some sort of bread)

Spending the morning going for some more walks and then thanking and saying goodbye to the family for having hosted us. When we had first arrived we brought with us a bottle of Famous Old Grouse whiskey, as it is customary to bring a gift when staying with the family- and this was a good present apparently 🙂

Our car had changed for the last leg of the journey to a normal car, which was fine but meant we were 4 big boys at the back-OUCH- we departed and of we were! But 1hour later we were stopped by the police…they were not too amused to see 4 people sitting at the back and after we talked with the officers, giving our foreign charm, they agreed to take Dulung to the next village so he could catch a bus and no other problems. The police also decided it was a good time to have a photography session with us- so quite alot of posing and Victory signs later we were off again!! But we forgot to take pics with them also! 🙁

 

We had some emotional goodbye’s with Dulung, our guide. He is our age and our time together was more 5 buddies travelling, laughing and getting drunk together- we still keep in contact using our weixin, and have invited to stay with us in Zhuhai where we would guide him to the local Island!! (next blog? :D)

InternChina - Dulung being a god - Dulung in the Gobi Desert
InternChina – Dulung being a god – Dulung in the Gobi Desert

Weixin / WeChat: is a Chinese app (similar to whatsapp) which everyone uses here in China. You should download it if you’re coming to China!

 

We arrived in Hohhot at 8pm, tired and exhausted, no showers for 5 days, bodies filled with sands everywhere, un-kept beards and  full of amazing adventure memories. Inner Mongolia/become mongolian men/adventure time= Success!

We checked in to the same hotel : Wanli Hotel and had the longest showers in the world. On our way to the rooms we found the room service lady/ her trolley and raided it for extra shampoo and shower gels as we were super dirty! :p

We had a early dinner and then me and Joe went back to the room to sleep-NACKERED-…John and Max went to a bar called: Seattle Bar- Do Not Go there– they had 3 drinks and don’t remember coming home- we are pretty sure their drinks got spiked with drugs as we are all heavy drinkers.

 

4/10/2013-Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Province – Grass Plains

10am wake-up. John had a lie-in but Joe, Max and myself went walking from our hotel to the Great Mosque of Hohhot (where john met up with us). Hohhot was on the old Silk Road and there is a big cultural mix, including a thriving Muslim community. The walk was long but got a good feeling of the city- not much going on- but the Mosque was beautiful and the surrounding area very interesting with street markets and pet markets: they had all kinds of animals and MASSIVE snakes.

InternChina - Hohhot - old men chilling at the Mosque
InternChina – Hohhot – old men chilling at the Mosque
InternChina - Hohhot Street Market - Lamb head
InternChina – Hohhot Street Market – Lamb head
InternChina - Hohhot pet market - 7m Long SNAKE!
InternChina – Hohhot pet market – 7m Long SNAKE!

 

Had some good lunch= Big grilled Naan breads with lamb bbq, followed by going to visit Lama Buddhism temples, pagoda’s, old street market and  yes…we got more fireworks for our last night in Hohhot!!! The guys were super nice, we were the first foreigners to have gone in their shop so they gave us all the fireworks for free!! We proposed to take pictures so they could print it out and use it as advertisement!

InternChina - John Pitts, Philippe Touzin, Maxime Dupuis, Fireworks Boss, and Boss's son
InternChina – John Pitts, Philippe Touzin, Maxime Dupuis, Fireworks Boss, and Boss’s son

Last Dinner and night life

 

For our last dinner we had a Meat Fest-6kg of meat between 4 guys- 1 huge lamb leg and a full rack of ribs- It was the BEST Lamb meat we had ever had and we washed it all down with local beer- we ended up having some locals join our able, one of them being the 2nd best Inner Mongolian champion wrestler and a bunch of girls of one who nearly vomited on Max. :p

 

InternChina - Last meal in Hohhot - MEAT FEST
InternChina – Last meal in Hohhot – MEAT FEST
InternChina - #MeetJohnyPitts
InternChina – #MeetJohnyPitts

After this we headed to a Mongolian bar which had live music and local Mongolians drinking- it was fun and good until- the Mongolians got too drunk, one got angry wiped out a mini sword and smacked one of them hard on the head (with the scabbard still on thankfully), then he ran out , came back and slashed another guy on the arm with the scabbard off and then ran out again, this time chased by other guys carrying, not chairs, but tables—it was shocking but slightly comedic at the same time. I then approached then with Joe and offered to give first aid as IC employees in all offices are first aid trained. They both needed stitches but they’ll be ok.

After that we finished our drinks and decided to go clubbing, found a “Box Club” which, I swear, smelled like horses! Club are the same everywhere else in the world and we ended  up drinking / making mates with another Mongolian and coming home at 4am.

 

5/10/2013-Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Province – back to GuangZhou

12:00 get up and check out. We had been eating Mongolian food all week and were hungover so we went to McDonald’s to set ourselves right. We then kept going with some more tourism by going to tourist shops and buying some small gifts (combs, bracelets,…) for our friends and family back home!

3:00pm return to Guangzhou Airport. On arrival in Guangzhou you can easily take a express bus to the Center of Zhuhai, Gongbei station (last stop). For more info please contact: info@internchina.com

I hope to go back and go into real Mongolia (the country), although the travel and experiences we had felt very authentic and Mongolian. I highly recommend learning some Chinese and speaking some basic Chinese as this way you get to skip all the mass tour groups and discover the Real Inner Mongolia (or chat with Andal guesthouse 🙂 )

 

Thank you for  reading, and please do not hesitate to stop by Zhuhai InternChina office for some tea and stories.

 

USTRAAAYYYAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!

(cheeerrs)

 

Philippe

 

More information on travelling to Inner Mongolia :

https://www.lonelyplanet.com/searchResult?q=inner+mongolia&facet=origin%3Athorntree_thread

Where to find friends to go with you on an Epic Adventure : https://www.internchina.com/zh/contact/apply

 

Weekend Trips

Trip to Guilin- part one

Hi it’s Miriam again- just arrived from an awesome Trip to Yangshuo-Guilin at the weekend. So many things happened and we visited so many great places- there is too much stuff to write it down in one single blog. So here it is: Guilin Part one!

InternChina – Guilin Mountains

We started Friday night. The bus took us directly to one of the most beautiful places on earth. Guilin is a city in North Guangxi and one of the best known tourist destinations in China.

InternChina – Jack, Sunny and I

After arriving in the early morning and eating a famous Guilin Rice Noodles breakfast we started a great boat trip on the Li River, passing the Mountains printed on every 20 RMB bank note.

InternChina – Group Picture

How many things you can do and see in one day? A lot: Having Lunch right next to the famous Moon Mountain,

InternChina – Moon Mountain

Visiting the one of the many caves in Guilin, the Silver Cave,

InternChina – The Silvercave

Walking around in the streets, enjoy the relaxed feeling of all the locals, sitting in front of their houses, playing cards and selling handmade jewellery,

InternChina – Streets in Guilin

And then finally going to Yangshuo! After walking around and buying some warmer clothes, because nobody in Zhuhai knows cold weather anymore we went out for Dinner to enjoy the famous Beer fish.

InternChina – Daria, Dmitry and Deepak

Rest of the night: baijiu, beer, wet duvets, icecream, 5D movies and ganbei.

InternChina – Iiiiiiicecream!!!

That was an awesome Saturday!