Pagoda Pack

WELCOME TO YOUR PAGODA PACK!

Most of the pack contents are self explanatory but some require some ‘assembly’  🙂

Some of the elements can be used in challenges to earn you points for the Pagoda Leaderboard!

For the full list of challenges and instructions please visit the Pagoda Challenges Page

NAVIGATION

SUSTAINABILITY

Being environmentally friendly is very important to us, so we tried our best to chose sustainable pack items where possible

  • Pens – Bamboo Barrels
  • Paper stickers instead of vinyl
  • Sticky Notes made from 100% FSC certified paper which are 100% recyclable
  • Natural cotton tote bags, take them to the shops to save plastic!
  • Aluminium drinks bottle to save on plastic bottle use
  • Recycled Aluminium plant pots with cork which can be used again and again

PAGODA ORIGAMI

PAGODA CHALLENGE

HOW HIGH CAN YOU GO?

Stack the Pagoda Origami layers on top of each other to build the tallest pagoda possible! Send us a pic of your achievements Send via the app to Bea Moreno or to beatriz.moreno@pagodaprojects.com to get 50 leaderboard points.

KNOT MAKING

PAGODA CHALLENGE

THEY LOVE ME, THEY LOVE ME KNOT

With the cord included in your pack, attempt these awesome knots from around the world and show us your efforts!
Send via the app to Bea Moreno or to beatriz.moreno@pagodaprojects.com to get 50 leaderboard points.

Good Luck Knot

Double Coin Knot

Celtic Heart

Ball Keychain

PAGODA PLANE

PAGODA CHALLENGE

FLY FAR AND WILD!

Use the ‘thank you’ page from your pack to make the Pagoda Plane.

Once crafted, share videos/pics with us on –
+ The farthest you could get it to fly
+ The best trick shot you could do

Send via the app to Bea Moreno or to beatriz.moreno@pagodaprojects.com to get 50 leaderboard points!

PAGODA PLANT

PAGODA CHALLENGE

HERBIVORE

Care and nurture your plant during your programme and see how much it can grow.

Send us pics/videos of your growth via the app to Bea Moreno or to beatriz.moreno@pagodaprojects.com to get 50 leaderboard points!

Find the best spot for your indoor herb –

To grow well indoors, herbs need as much natural light as possible. Place them in a sunny spot near a window that faces south and receives at least 6 hours of sun daily. (While indoor light is not quite as intense as direct light outdoors, light coming in through an unblocked, south-facing window is enough for most herbs.) Some herbs that require less light, like mint, parsley, and thyme, can also grow well in west-facing windows.

Be sure to keep an eye out for signs that your herbs are not getting enough light. These include poor growth, stems that grow unusually long between leaf sets, leaves that are smaller than usual, and stems or leaves that are abnormally pale or begin to turn yellow.

Give indoor herbs good drainage.

First follow any instructions provided with your tube plant (some types have no instructions)

Don’t overwater your plant. The best way to ruin most herbs is to let them sit in water so the roots will rot.

A good rule of thumb for most herbs is to water about once or twice per week. During extreme heat or drought conditions, sometimes thrice per week will be needed. Water in the cooler hours of the morning, between 6 – 10 am, to avoid evaporation and allow for deep root soaking.

Indoor herbs are happy with typical indoor temperatures.

Many cooks grow herbs indoors during the winter when it’s too cold outside or too wet to dig in the dirt, but you can grow herbs inside any time of year. Indoor herbs prefer the same temperatures that most people do—around 65 to 70 degrees F—so if you’re comfortable, they probably are. At night, temperatures near a window may drop to 55 or 60, but most herbs like that, too. Keep foliage from touching glass to protect from getting nipped by cold.

Basil is trickier. Many kitchen gardeners yearn for basil in their indoor garden. If you have plenty of sun and warmth indoors, basil should thrive, but don’t keep it on a cool windowsill. Basil leaves will droop and fade after a short time in cool air. It prefers indoor temperatures in the 70s day and night.

Remember that the air next to a window will be cooler in winter (or hotter in summer) than your average indoor temperature, so adjust your plants accordingly. Dry air, whether from air conditioning or heating, is hard on most herbs, so you may want to consider increasing the surrounding humidity.

Indoor herb plants will probably stretch and be spindlier than plants in the outdoors, but they will still give you plenty of fresh clippings. To encourage lots of growth, especially if you are harvesting leaves regularly.

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